BORAGE CARRIER OIL - BENEFITS AND USES

IN ESSENCE...



 

HISTORY OF BORAGE

 

Cooked as a vegetable, eaten as a salad, and mixed with wine, the Borage plant has a long history of being a commonly ingested plant. It is popularly known for being one of the richest sources of Gamma-Linolenic Acid.

It is only recently that Borage seeds Oil started appearing in skincare products, but in ancient times Borage was referred to as beebread because bees loved the blue star-shaped flower. The plant was also called starflower, as a result of its blue star-shaped appearance. Throughout history, Borage has been referred to as a spirit lifter. The Greek physician Dioscorides claimed, "Borage can cheer the heart and lift depressed spirits."

Primarily cultivated in the Northern hemisphere, the Borage plant is native to the Eastern Mediterranean region. It is now grown in various parts of Europe, including Great Britain and parts of North America. In many areas of Europe, the leaves are prepared as a vegetable. Eating the various parts of this plant provided the Essential Fatty Acids needed and functioned as a tonic to those suffering from depression. In the Middle Ages, Borage leaves were commonly brewed into a medicinal tea since they were believed to cure fevers, coughs, and even depression.

In the Odyssey by Greek Poet Homer, Borage is the herb that brought on forgetfulness when mixed in wine. When Roman soldiers went to war, Borage flowers were steeped in their wine the night before they were going to battle. This allowed the soldiers to forget their worries and focus on the war. The flowers added flavor to their wine and functioned as a potion for providing courage to the soldiers. To further support this theory, the English name of the plant is derived from the Celtic word Borrach, which directly translates to a person of courage.



 

BORAGE CARRIER OIL BENEFITS

 

The main chemical constituents of Borage Carrier Oil are: Oleic Acid, Phytosterol, Linoleic Acid, Gamma Linolenic Acid, and Tocopherols.

OLEIC ACIDS are believed to:

LINOLENIC ACIDS are believed to:

PHYTOSTEROLS are believed to:

GAMMA LINOLENIC ACID is believed to:

Filled with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, Borage Carrier Oil is believed to be beneficial for people with atopic dermatitis. Borage Carrier Oil works to soothe itchy skin and reduce the redness caused by atopic dermatitis. The protective properties in the oil ensure the repair of vital skin tissues.

Used in hair, Borage Carrier Oil can aid in restoring strength, shine, and radiance to dry, brittle, dull, and tired hair, while promoting hair growth and fighting against hair loss. Borage Carrier Oil is believed to assist in treating cardiovascular problems and works towards improving the sensitivity of joints and relieving pain caused by stiffness.

Borage oil has a high concentration of the Essential Fatty Acids needed in our body. Gamma Linoleic Acid is a type of fatty acid that our bodies convert to Prostaglandin. The oil then acts as a hormone, helping reduce inflammation related to skin diseases and cardiovascular issues.

As a result of its oily residue, many Borage Carrier Oil users prefer diluting the oil with other carrier oils before directly applying the oil to the skin.



 

CULTIVATING AND HARVESTING QUALITY BORAGE

 

The Borage plant is a part of the Boraginaceae family which consists of over 2700 species of herbaceous hairy annual and perennial plants. The Borage plant is a fast-growing annual plant that can grow up to 60cm (two feet) tall.

The plant has a cucumber-like fragrance and grows well beside crops such as tomatoes, squash, cabbage, and even enhances the flavor of strawberries. This low maintenance plant requires a growing temperature of 21°C and grows best when the sun is full. Full sun is a term used to describe the sun shining for at least six hours a day. When the sun shines on the plant the plant does not need to exhaust its energy on stem growth. In contrast, when the plant does not receive adequate sunlight, the plant stretches itself to obtain sunlight.

While the plant stretches to receive enough sunlight, the seeds of the plant require the exact opposite. When Borage seeds are first planted into the soil, they do not have many soil requirements and can be grown on all types of soil but grow best on medium to rich well-drain soil. The seeds need to be planted ¼ inches under the soil since the tiny seeds require complete darkness to grow. Borage seeds are only the size of a grain of white rice and are either dark brown or black. While the plant re-grows itself each harvest season, the seeds initially need to be planted about 12-24 inches apart and require a space of two-four feet between each row of seeds. The seeds can be planted two to four weeks before or after the last frost. The seeds are warmed by the soil and the snow above the ground. During the cold wintertime, the seeds stay dormant.

Both the stalks and leaves of the Borage plant can be harvested. The stalks and leaves are covered with tiny gray hairs that act as thorns and tend to get pricklier as the plant matures.



 

EXTRACTING AND REFINING BORAGE CARRIER OIL

 

The Borage Carrier Oil extraction process begins with the careful selection of quality raw seeds of Borago officinalis.

Cold pressing is a chemical-free process that involves Borage seeds being placed inside a horizontal press with a rotating screw. The screw brings the seeds to a barrel-shaped compartment and compresses the seeds until the oil squeezes out. This is the first step to creating Borage Carrier Oil.

The next step in the process is called filtration. Like its name, this step filters the oil with the help of a mesh screen that collects the excess waste produced by Borage seeds and presents a cleaner, purer oil that is higher in natural colors and scents. There are several filtration methods. In fact, further refining steps are involved to produce a more versatile oil.

Once the oil has gone through the extraction process the final pale yellow to golden yellow Borage Carrier Oil is ready to be packaged and sold.

Cold-pressed oils like Borage Carrier Oil are recommended to be kept in a cool, dark place to maintain the oil's freshness and achieve maximum shelf life.



 

USES OF BORAGE CARRIER OIL

 

The uses of Borage Carrier Oil are ample, ranging from medicinal to cosmetic. It is used in many forms including face oils, face serums, massage oils, and even body balms.

For a soothing body balm formulation melt 1 tsp Lanolin, 1 tbsp Borage Carrier Oil, 2 tbsp Coconut Carrier Oil, and 1/2 – 1 tbsp Grated Beeswax in a double boiler. Once the mixture has been boiled, pour the blend into an airtight container, and let it cool down.

Borage Carrier Oil is commonly used in manufacturing skin care products and by massage therapists. The oil is beneficial in hydrating the skin and acts as an anti-aging oil that repairs and rehydrates the skin. Massage therapists use the oil to reduce stress, relax the body and mind, and soothe tense muscles.

When a small amount (10% or less) of Borage Carrier Oil is added to other carrier oils, Borage Oil supports and enhances the potential of the skincare product it's blended with.

Make a relaxing massage oil by mixing 1 tbsp Jojoba Carrier Oil, 1 tbsp Sweet Almond Carrier Oil, ½ tbsp Olive Carrier Oil, and ½ tbsp Borage Carrier Oil.

Ease skin conditions such as acne, dermatitis, Psoriasis, and eczema by using Borage Carrier Oils in your skincare routine.

For a nice refreshing face serum blend ¼ tbsp Rosehip Carrier Oil, 2 tbsp Jojoba Carrier Oil, ¼ tbsp Borage Carrier Oil, 8 drops of Lavender Essential Oil, 3 drops of Geranium organic Essential Oil, and 1 drop of Ylang Ylang Essential Oil.



 

GUIDE TO BORAGE CARRIER OIL

 

Botanical Name: Borago officinalis

Extraction Method: Cold-pressed

Obtained From: Seeds

Description: Reduce inflammation, hydrate, and heal dry skin, reduce eczema, prevent hair loss, relieve aching joints, and works to improve hormonal imbalance.

Caution: Not recommended for use during pregnancy



 

CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR BORAGE CARRIER OIL

 

As with all other New Directions Aromatics products, carrier oils are for external use only. Borage Carrier Oil should not be ingested and should not be stored within the reach of children, in case of accidental ingestion. As with all other oils, a patch test should be conducted on the inner arm or other insensitive areas of skin, using a dime-size amount of Borage Carrier Oil to check for sensitivities. An absence of an allergic response within 48 hours indicates that the oil is safe to use.

The topical application of Borage Carrier Oil is not known to have side effects. In the rare chance of an allergic reaction, discontinue the use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.

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